An Elemental Update

Following my last post (Found here) about my vision of the pig-man in room 1302 in the Manor House at the Stanley Hotel, which immediately skyrocketed to my most popular, being shared and discussed across social networks (my eternal thanks for your interest), new details have come to light.

Callea got into contact with Madame Vera, asking about the pig-man that she saw a year earlier in the same room. Vera described the entity as an Elemental left from the days of the Native Americans and older than the hotel itself.

Pigs, she went on to describe, are also for luck in the new year. Considering the new year I’ve had so far, there could be something to that.

But upon doing a bit of preliminary research on Leap Castle for a project, I came across descriptions of the infamous elemental that haunts the Irish castle. Mildred Darby, married the property owner in 1889, was a rumored occultist who is said to have discovered the entity, and describes it in an article. “It’s face was human, or to be more accurate, inhuman, in it’s vileness, with large holes of blackness for eyes, loose slobbery lips, and a thick saliva-dripping jaw, sloping back suddenly into its neck! Nose it had none, only spreading, cancerous cavities, the whole face being a uniform tint of grey.”

I was struck by this description. Though no comparison was drawn between the Irish Elemental and a pig, I was interested by the description of the hollowed eye sockets and suggestion of a missing nose, in the same way as I described.

You can find more information on Leap Castle and their Elemental here http://leapcastle.net/?page_id=41

 

Edit to Add: Nic, who runs the Leap Castle website, just added an interesting update in the comments section down below that also seems to fit nicely. “In many cultures, elementals and lower astral entities take on a hybrid form of both human and animal…it is quite fascinating.”

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28 thoughts on “An Elemental Update

  1. Jenn says:

    Wow!! That’s interesting. Well, let’s hope it rings true and you’ll have a lucky year. (:

    That’s still super interesting, you seeing the pig-man, and Madame Vera seeing it too. That’s really cool.

    Have an awesome week.

    -Jenn

  2. Nic says:

    Thanks for mentioning my site! It is most appreciated!

    The pig-man does sound extremely interesting. In many cultures, elementals and lower astral entities take on a hybrid form of both human and animal…it is quite fascinating.

    Looking forward to hearing more about this one!

    Nic

  3. glennraymond says:

    Karl,

    This is great to see a follow up on your Stanley visit. I am fascinated by the entire topic of elementals. My wife is part Native American and she, of coarse, is reading over my shoulder right now. (She says Hi, and would adopt you any time.) She has always been deeply rooted in the beliefs of her ancestors and legends passed down. I will have her type in here what she says with quotation marks.

    “My own ancestors never spoke specifically about a pig man, but it would not be unusual for some tribal beliefs to go in that direction. There may have been more tribes in the area of the Stanley, I don’t know for sure. I do know that largely two tribes frequented the Northern Rockies here in Colorado. They were the Ute and the Arapahoe. I also know the Arapahoe believed that one of the mountains near Estes Park was a ‘Power Spot.’ This would be a sacred area where they would spend a lot of time seeking visions and contacting the elements. My people were from the Ohio River Valley, back east. I think we all have our beliefs of shape shifters, human’s who can mimic a spicific animal if they feel the need. Perhaps this is your pig man, but what truly comes to mind is somewhat more sinister than the elementals of my heritage. Elementals are loving, giving and friendly as long as you are a straight and honorable person. Each has a designated area or thing they protect ‘for the elements, from wrong doers.’ For instance tree elementals, rock elementals, etc.”

    She is suggesting studying the specific tribes of the area, look on maps at there territories and meanderings found in history related books. Pin them down and look at the individual tribes beliefs and ways. She has a bad impression of the pig man, but reminds me to tell you she loves this. Great work. We’ll have to keep reading.

    • karlpfeiffer says:

      Unbelievable discussion I’m getting on this! Really fantastic feedback. Thank you for taking the time to give me this background.

      It’s a great direction to move in and search for those more immediate parallels that speak to location as much as general folklore. This info here serves as a great starting point to look further. Consideration of natural, culturally powerful, energetic areas is also important for investigators to consider.

      Absolutely this was a fairly sinister image, but the interesting part was further that it didn’t give me any negative impressions, where normally I, as anyone else, would’ve been pretty well freaked out. So I wonder if the appearance is something we’d take to be discomforting but is that of a benevolent entity.

      Of course, on the other hand, Irish tradition consider elementals to be darker, inhuman entities, but neutral. Powerful, violent if rubbed the wrong way, they’re generally also natural and don’t have particular leanings toward malevolence one way or the other.

      Fascinating to look into this and dig at it. If I can manage the time I’ll definitely take a look at more of the Native American history near Estes. Your guys’ information was fantastic, thank you so much! If anything else comes across your desk, keep me posted!

  4. Nic says:

    Karl you are certainly correct about the Irish view of Elementals. Many are considered quite unpredictable and prefer to be left alone.

    The Leap Castle Elemental is a fascinating entity and there are many theories as to how it came to be. These range from It being placed there by druids to guard an ancient initiation site where the castle now stands, the Elemental being placed there by a warring clan, attempting to drive the O’Carrolls out from the inside and It being either pure manifestation or a being drawn to all of the bloodshed that has been concentrated within Leap.

    Even today the Elemental does not like to be disturbed and people will generally not get into any trouble as long as they leave it alone. Be warned, it has a great memory and will not forget you if you try to provoke it!

  5. glennraymond says:

    We will love to check back, and keep you posted as well. This is extremely fascinating. My wife has been wondering about the Irish viewpoint on elementals. The novel she is currently working on will have both Irish and Native American elementals and set in both countries.

  6. glennraymond says:

    “It’s me, Glenn’s wife. I wanted to let you know I am still digging through all of my files and books, but the main tribes that were known to be in that area were Ute, and the Arapahoe and Cheyenne spent the summers there. Of coarse, the names of old mountains change but someone at the Geological Survey may be able to help. There was an archeaological dig done in the ’70’s’. They found a prehistoric site on Old Man Mountain, (a cone shaped mountain somewhere west of Estes Park. On this dig they could tell it was some kind of sacred spot, and there were newer pottery shards and the like that showed other tribes had been visiting there. The One I am thinking of is actually just east and south of Estes, but I cannot recall the name. So I am still digging. Other tribes such as the Pawnee and Apache did visit the area once in a while but I don’t get the impression that they were as prevalent up there. I have also been going over the maps I have and I cannot find “Old Man Mountain” on them, but maps are pretty bad about naming them all. I was wondering if it could be the mountain where the aerial tramway is, or was. I have not been to Estes since I was 17, so that was a ‘few’ years ago. I am hoping it may be very close to the Stanley. I need to find my topo maps and maybe even my geological data map. Actually that Ogden Twetto Geological data map could show something we could referrence against a newer map. I will dig that out and try that. There are so many possible Native American specific pieces of info around here somewhere. I would so love to go up there in halfway good weather and spend several days just checking things out. That would really rock. (hard core rock, not soft!) We will check back again soon. In the mean time, Hau! S.A.

  7. glennraymond says:

    Old Man Mountain or Man Mountain, is where the Elkhorn Lodge is. Look up the lodge on the web. They have the history. My wife says she remembers seeing the lodge, but she has never been there. She has a bunch of geological info. for you, concerning the many different types of rock, ie., quartz (as you know) but very specific from her Ogden Tweto Geological map. Also, she says to tell you any stone, bone, tree, shell etc. becomes cryptocrystalline quartz over many thousands of years. This is what petrified wood is. There is a good chance that “Power Spot” could really be a great site. She wants to camp there. Next, to find out the rest of the Native history of the entire area around the Stanley, specific beliefs, etc. She found more Pig man mythology for you too. Should she just keep posting here? Keep on keepin’ on.

    • karlpfeiffer says:

      Absolutely keep posting. between school, writing and this lecture series I have coming up, i have so little time for research, but what you guys are digging up here is absolutely fascinating and I’d love to hear more as you come across it!

  8. glennraymond says:

    “I’ve seen it many times! I just was clueless. Its right off Fall River Road. I have somethings to tell you, concerning the crevasses, and the gal that was rescued there last summer. But I have a lot to tell you anyway. So, more later. Stay safe and warm.”

  9. suzieashby says:

    “About the ‘crevasses’ mentioned above, the area of Estes was largely a result of the last glacier that scraped through there, but it was the old buzzard’s constant spooky comment of “There’s pumas in the crevasses” that made me say crevasses instead of crevices.

    Many tribal cultures (so as not to pin any one down) placed their dead snuggly in crevices. I read up on the gal who was rescued from a crevice last summer and just got the willies.

    It is very safe for me to say that all of the above mentioned tribes were all over the area surrounding and including Estes Park and the location of the Stanley. There are most likely more historical accounts of interaction with these tribes, but finding it and pinning it down will take some time.

    I must say right now, it is illegal to take anything, like stones, crystals, plants, arrowheads or other items from within the boundaries of Rocky Mountain national park. Should, however you find something and want to take a photograph do not touch it if it looks like it could be a relic of funerary origin, until you know exactly what it is. You do not want to stir up spirits like that. But I know you personally would never do such a thing, others might be tempted. I think it is also safe to say, all over the state many crystal and arrowhead specimens have come home in the pockets of those who value the addition of a good piece to their personal collections.

    Largely, the area surrounding and including the Stanley and Old Man Mountain is made up of granitic rocks dating back approximately 1,400 million years. These precambrian rocks include a strong iron content and within it are Feldspar, Biotitc Gneiss, Schist, magmatic Hornblende, Calc-Silicate rock, Quartzite and Marble.

    What all this breaks down to as far as energy conduction goes, is ‘PAY-DIRT!’ Please excuse the pun, it was not intended.

    The quartz content in the area is anywhere from 10 to 50% just in the granite alone. Quartz crystals have been found in the area. The calc-silicate rocks are a lime compound with a crystal structure of SiO4 tetrahedra crystals. Silica: SiO2, QUARTZ is found in Cryptocrystalline (Microcrystalline, or Petrified) Chalcedony: Agate made up of quartz and opal.

    Taking all of this into consideration, the area is ‘charged.’

  10. suzieashby says:

    Now, I looked up a tiny bit on pigs and pig-men. There are a lot of very interesting beliefs from many different cultures around the world. In Sumerian and Greek lore, Tammuz and Adonis were both slain by boars. Ares/Mars (god of war) believed the boar was sacred. Don’t forget, Cerce turned men into swine. One of Vishnu’s aspects was a boar. In Japan and China a white boar represented all the qualities a warrior should have. Heimdal, a Norse god’s father was of pig blood. A pig -faery was a half man-half pig. What I have read, the Celts (I believe having a broad range of cultural societies) protection, fertility, hunting and war. In Welsh lore, merlin talked with a tiny pig in his visions and mostly involved a magical white sow assaciated with the moon. In Pacific Ocean regions, a boar with tusks was sacred to some of the men’s societies.

    I found it all interesting, but I think, as with a vision in general, it comes down to exactly what it symbolizes to you personally. Use the quallities, both bad and good to figure out how it plays into your life.

    As an entity or spirit, we still need to know how these tribes viewed them, but perhaps it was a Warrior Spirit, I say perhaps. Also, in passed time, was anyone who is historically known to have died there any of the above mentioned cultures. There is still much to look into, but you really have my mind going. I cannot believe I spent a few days every summer for the first 17 years of my life up there taking in all of it, while never taking it all in.

    I am very excited to learn much more about this Pig-Man entity. There is a background there, I am sure of it.”

    • karlpfeiffer says:

      I’m not really sure I want to approach it as a vision per se. Obviously all these cultures have similar but broadly different perspectives on the symbolism and significance of the boar or pig. Many western mythologies of more modern time associate the pig with filth and so connotate it with darkness, thusly there’s very little in modern tradition. Essentially though, to establish an internal meaning from it, to me, would be to devalue it to the point of general fortune telling, which I see as making it rather meaningless. But the sight was so external to me, i really believe it to be not a message, but an entity in and of itself, and so I’d really be fascinated to hear more on the pig man entity himself too!

      Seriously, this is amazing background. You guys are like my own personal Bobby Singers! If that doesn’t make sense, ignore it. It means you’re great at research 😉

  11. glennraymond says:

    She will be very happy to hear that. We both think of it as an entity. And it is good that you do, because it is. There are so many more areas to dig into with this. We are happy to do it. We love this field and we love learning things. We will continue to keep in touch here.

  12. suzieashby says:

    Karl,

    I wanted to let you know, according to Ute history that entire area up there was Arapaho territory. Now I was thinking along the lines of perhaps a Shaman entity, but the Arapaho did not have Shamans. However they did have Medicine Men/Priests or High Priests. Where a Shamananic beliefe may include the Shaman taking on an animal spirit’s persona to do soul retrieval work, Medicine Men did not. An Arapaho Medicine Man may pray to specific animal species to help an afflicted person get well, but they would not have actually invoked an animal spirit to do it. I am not certain, but I don’t think there were even feral pigs for the natives at that time to have much interaction with. I will keep looking into it, but for now I can’t pin down anything native about the Pig-Man. As far as the Pig-Man goes, I am intrigued by it and would really like to continue looking into any and all directions this could go. This is all so fascinating and I am wanting warm weather to hurry up and get here so I can go up there and spend some time poking around.

    Now, his name has escaped me momentarily, but the man who first laid claim to the area around the Stanley was a hunter from Baz’s part of the universe. I was wondering if the Pig-Man could have something to do with him.

    I have to ask Nic and you, elementally speeking, an elemental would not have come across to you in such a calm manner, would one? My belief’s they can and do, but when we are talking about Elementals, we are not talking about my kind. I get the impression they are not an entity one hopes to come across, right?

    I am going to re-read all of this again and see what I am forgetting or missing. I’ll be back soon.

    • karlpfeiffer says:

      Well thank god it wasn’t a Shaman doing soul retrieval work! haha. I’ve heard a couple things lately pointing toward Lord Dunraven’s cultural heritage as being a possibility for the presence of a more cross-continental entity, though that begins to broaden the scale quite a bit more.

      I’d address the elemental bit, but Nic’s done a perfect job down below.

      • glennraymond says:

        And she says, “Yes, Nic is quite the peach. I would love to hear more from you about Lord Dunraven. Is there anything leaning toward Pig Man there? Also, yes, that soul retrieval sounds like a nasty bit of work, doesn’t it. I’m glad I lean toward Medicine Men and not Shamans…..

        Wee Ghosties, indeed. I am still digging at the archeology and the NA history. It is good information to know. There are so many things to consider and I love this. I am really enjoying it, so thank you. Oh, Happy Valentines Day. I hope you have a sweet one.”

  13. Nic says:

    It really depends on the type of Elemental.

    Some can be very hostile and some can be quite serene and could not care less about interaction with humans. It largely depends on the individual and the circumstances. They usually stick to their own and only make an appearance if they are either summoned, have been placed their for a purpose such as a guardian ( a Golum is a classic example) or have been existing in a site before a human presence.

    Elementals are quite a complex group of beings as there is many different forms within the main group; be it fire, water, earth, Air etc.

    • glennraymond says:

      Nic,

      “This is probably a dumb question, but if the Pig-Man was an elemental, and I had to toss in a guess, do you think he would fall under an Earthly entity designated to watch over the area? Well, to me that would make him rather cranky and not very friendly which kind of sounds opposite Karl’s experience with him.

      I just thought of another NA related possibility. I’ll have to dig around and see what I can find, as far as the Arapaho go. There are good and bad in every culture and aside from the surface I’ve scratched, I neglected to look at the darker side of ‘their’ beliefs. Still digging.

      Thank You Nic. You are awesome.”

  14. glennraymond says:

    Nic,

    This is all so very interesting. I am glad you had some time to give us more insight. Thank you for that. When she gets home I’ll tell her to boot up and get busy. She is really excited about all of this. We both love it. I think she lives for it, maybe even more than cake.

    I know she will be eternally grateful for all of your information. Thank You.

  15. suzieashby says:

    Nic,

    Thank you for the much appreciated information. I may have come across some more info. but I am still digging around in it.

    I feel there is something greatly symbolic about the pig-man, but I just can’t pin it down. My brain keeps going back to maybe the guy was just a real swine, but that’s too easy!

    I want to understand so much more about all of the elementals and want to really pick your brain. I will continue to dig. Many Blessings, and Light.

    • karlpfeiffer says:

      Pigs were very specific in Germanic culture for luck in the new year, which has been abundant for me so far. Perhaps that’s something to it. But I’m still leaning toward this as an entity more than a symbol. But when we’re dealing with this realm, who knows how much the two cross.

      You guys are great!

  16. suzieashby says:

    I agree, it is an entity. I am just curious why it would show itself as the Pig-Man and thought, perhaps the pig is something symbolic to the entity itself. For example, if it was a man, was he a hunter who loved hunting boars. Does this make sense? I try to take things a step deeper into the pool of possibilities, so as not to miss anything, or overlook anything.

    I think of it as a layering. The people we are today, are made up of all the accumulated layers of events we’ve been through and the things we like and don’t like. So I just try to get into those layers is all I am saying. No, I do not think of the entiity as something symbolic to you or any person who sees it. I just want to get into the many facets of possible angles which could be reasons for being The Pig-Man. I may be digging too deeply. I do that sometimes and wind up getting let down because I expect more than what I find, but I just don’t want to overlook anything pertinent.

    So, I am understanding that the Arapaho loved the entire area up there. It was their territory. The Gros Ventre People were a spin off from the original Arapahoes. I have not found the Gros Ventre in the Estes Park area. However, the French mistakenly named the ‘Gros Ventres’ (‘Big Bellies’) and some peoples referred to the Arapahoes of Estes Park and the surrounding norhtern areas as the ‘Big Bellies.’

    I know it isn’t much, but it is another piece of the history of Arapahoes that considered the entire area their home. To them the area was very sacred. The Arapaho considered any hill, such as Old Man Mountain, and any body of water sacred, even the rivers.

    I will continue to keep digging. I find this all so interesting. You take care for now, and I’ll pop inagain soon.

  17. suzieashby says:

    By the way, Thank You Nic. And Karl is right, nothing stands in the way of cake.

  18. suzieashby says:

    I am so sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you. It has simply been one thing after another.

    I feel I have a good strong theory about the Pigman.

    When the Arapaho went on Vision Quests, a ritual for aquiring “medecine” in order to be a high preist, etc. they would call upon the spirits and ask for their own spirit guide. The spirit guide always presented itself to the Arapaho person as a half man half animal. What ever the animal was, is what the spirit guide would always show itself as. The Arapaho person would then, such as the Pigman, make a medicine bag from pig skin and include personal power items such as, a hoof clipping, tooth, hair of the animal and such into the bag. Another important item in medicine bags (I know this from first hand experience) would be one or more crystals, turquoise, and the like. Also one sometimes includes a bit of sacrificial tobacco, or perhaps seeds to offer the spirit guide or (as in my case) to give as a gift of thanks, or burn as a smudge to help carry prayers.

    My thoughts on this are clear, I believe the Pigman is a spirit guide, who for one reason or another decided to stay. I do not believe he is malevolent. Just keep in mind, if the person who brought him was a bruja, which I doubt with all my gut and instinct, he could be angered easily.

    All this having been said, I would be very interested to know if anyone ever found an old pig skin bag durring the building of the Stanley, or even recently. As warmer weather draws ever nearer, I long more and more to get back up there and poke around a bit.

    I think to question the Pigman on his history, ask him if this is who/what he is would not be at all dangerous. His job was a good one. I hope I have helped with the Pigman. I love this type of thing and would not mind at all doing this more often. I am on Facebook more often than here, for a while, and visit Baz often. So, if nothing else you may be able to catch up with me there. I would also love to meet the sweet gal from the Stanley. Next time you get the chance, tell her I said hello. Blessings and Light, Suzie Q.

  19. […] (But the story gets even weirder. Read here for an Elemental Update…) […]

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